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Out Of Mind » RAINBOW WARRIORS & GLOBAL UPRISING » GLOBAL PROTESTS & PETITIONS » Protesting across the globe: What took people to the streets in 2014

Protesting across the globe: What took people to the streets in 2014

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Protesting across the globe: What took people to the streets in 2014
Published time: December 31, 2014 12:32
Get short URL

9312002
Trends
Eurozone crisis, Islamic State in Iraq and Syria, Israel-Gaza strikes, Scotland Referendum, Ukraine turmoil
Tags
Asia, Brazil, Clashes, Conflict, EU, Europe, Immigration, Israel, Mexico, North America, Police, Politics, Protest, Russia, Spain, UK, USA, Ukraine, Venezuela
Calls for independence, pleas to stop war, objection to mass surveillance, outrage over police brutality, and much more drove people to the streets in 2014. RT takes a look at what prompted millions around the globe to rise up.

Euromaidan and eastern Ukraine backfire

What is now known worldwide as Euromaidan can surely be named the protest of the year. The initially peaceful demonstrations which started as a reaction to then-President Viktor Yanukovich’s refusal to sign the EU association deal last year became violent in 2014.


A protestor throws a molotov cocktail at riot police in the centre of Kiev on January 22, 2014. (AFP Photo / Vasily Maximov)
Kiev’s central Independence Square - Maidan Nezalezhnosty - was turned into a battlefield as Ukrainian protesters clashed with police through January and February.
READ MORE: ‘Warzone’: Open street battles in Kiev as rioters, police face-off (PHOTOS)
Molotov cocktails started fires, which were fueled by rubber tires. The square and adjacent streets were engulfed in flames by night and smoke by day. Violent force - which led to a great number of casualties - was used by both Euromaidan supporters and riot police.


Riot police officers gather as they clash with protestors in the center of Kiev on January 22, 2014. (AFP Photo / Anatolii Boiko)
The unrest resulted in a coup that toppled Yanukovich and his government in February.
Those not satisfied with the new authorities who were appointed as a result of the coup - some in Kiev and most in eastern parts of Ukraine - took to the streets too. East Ukraine and Crimea said the new Kiev government was illegitimate and demanded a referendum to decide on the future of the region.




As no agreement was reached between the two parties, protesters started taking over the buildings of regional administrations, declaring independence from Kiev. In turn, Kiev launched a crackdown operation in April which turned into an ongoing military conflict.


A woman looks through a damaged entrance door as pro-Russian demonstrators hold a rally outside the regional government building in Donetsk, March 3, 2014. (Reuters / Stringer)
READ MORE: Ukraine’s killing fields in 10 stories: RT reporter goes to Lugansk and Donetsk
A total of 4,634 people have been killed and 10,243 injured since the start of the conflict, according to a December report from the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights.

Global protests against Israeli military op in Gaza

Thousands of people across the globe took to the streets in 2014 to protest against Israel’s 50-day 'Operation Protective Edge' in the Gaza Strip, which started on July 8 in retaliation to Hamas rocket fire.
During Israel's offensive, more than 2,100 Palestinians were killed, most of them civilians. Among the victims at least 469 were children, according to a senior UN Children’s Fund (UNICEF) official.


Protesters gather at Place de la Republique during a banned demonstration in support of Gaza in central Paris, July 26, 2014. (Reuters / Benoit Tessier)
Protesters from America to Australia joined in support of the Palestinians, with the most massive rallies taking place in the UK. The move was supported by hundreds in France, Chile, India, Austria, Lebanon, the Netherlands, Germany, Morocco, Turkey, Oman, Spain, Malaysia, and many other countries.
READ MORE: Thousands rally against Gaza strikes in London, Paris, Dublin, Tel Aviv


Demonstrators protest to support the people of Gaza, in central London August 9, 2014. (Reuters / Luke MacGregor)
In Israel, anti-war activists and Palestinians protested the operation in Tel Aviv, despite a police ban on public gatherings due to military restrictions in cities targeted by Hamas rockets.

US demonstrations against police brutality

The US witnessed a wave of protests across the country in 2014, following the death of Eric Garner - a 43-year-old black Staten Island resident - in July.


Protesters stage a "Die-In" on a display taxi cab in the Forever 21 store in Times Square, during a march against police violence, in New York, December 7, 2014. (Reuters / Andrew Kelly)
The video of the incident shot by a passerby shows New York Police Department Officer Daniel Pantaleo placing Garner in an apparent chokehold, while a group of other officers force Garner to the ground.
Garner, who reportedly suffered from asthma, died after repeatedly saying, “I can’t breathe." His phrase became the backbone of the protests, which began right after his death.


Logan Browning, with duct tape over her mouth, joins demonstrators protesting against police violence, including the July chokehold death of unarmed black man Eric Garner in New York, as they march near the area where LAPD shot an assault suspect on December 5, in Hollywood, California December 6, 2014. (Reuters / Patrick T. Fallon)
Another incident that prompted people to take to the streets in protest against police violence was the shooting of unarmed black teenager Michael Brown by white police officer Darren Wilson in Ferguson, Missouri in August.
The protests were fueled by the fact that Wilson was not indicted by a grand jury in November. Hundreds were arrested across the US as they rallied against the grand jury decision. The hands-up gesture became the symbol of the protest, as witnesses claimed Brown had his hands raised when he was shot.
READ MORE: No indictment: Clashes, arson after grand jury verdict for Ferguson cop


Members of a rowdy group of demonstrators stand with their hands up as they are lit by a police spotlight on West Florissant during protests in reaction to the shooting of Michael Brown near Ferguson, Missouri August 18, 2014. (Reuters / Lucas Jackson)
In December, the non-indictment of Daniel Pantaleo gave new momentum to the Garner protests. Following the jury’s decision, people in New York City and San Francisco gathered in protest, demonstrating with several 'die-ins.'
READ MORE: Dozens arrested as NYC protests Eric Garner decision
Residents of Boston, Atlanta, Chicago, Baltimore, Minneapolis, and other US cities staged protests against the jury’s decision. Demonstrators in London also showed solidarity with the US rallies.
Tens of thousands joined the 'Millions March' in New York City to protest against police brutality, as well as the non-indictment of officers in both cases.





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Protesting across the globe: What took people to the streets in 2014
Published time: December 31, 2014 12:32
Get short URL

9312002
Trends
Eurozone crisis, Islamic State in Iraq and Syria, Israel-Gaza strikes, Scotland Referendum, Ukraine turmoil
Tags
Asia, Brazil, Clashes, Conflict, EU, Europe, Immigration, Israel, Mexico, North America, Police, Politics, Protest, Russia, Spain, UK, USA, Ukraine, Venezuela
Calls for independence, pleas to stop war, objection to mass surveillance, outrage over police brutality, and much more drove people to the streets in 2014. RT takes a look at what prompted millions around the globe to rise up.

Euromaidan and eastern Ukraine backfire

What is now known worldwide as Euromaidan can surely be named the protest of the year. The initially peaceful demonstrations which started as a reaction to then-President Viktor Yanukovich’s refusal to sign the EU association deal last year became violent in 2014.


A protestor throws a molotov cocktail at riot police in the centre of Kiev on January 22, 2014. (AFP Photo / Vasily Maximov)
Kiev’s central Independence Square - Maidan Nezalezhnosty - was turned into a battlefield as Ukrainian protesters clashed with police through January and February.
READ MORE: ‘Warzone’: Open street battles in Kiev as rioters, police face-off (PHOTOS)
Molotov cocktails started fires, which were fueled by rubber tires. The square and adjacent streets were engulfed in flames by night and smoke by day. Violent force - which led to a great number of casualties - was used by both Euromaidan supporters and riot police.


Riot police officers gather as they clash with protestors in the center of Kiev on January 22, 2014. (AFP Photo / Anatolii Boiko)
The unrest resulted in a coup that toppled Yanukovich and his government in February.
Those not satisfied with the new authorities who were appointed as a result of the coup - some in Kiev and most in eastern parts of Ukraine - took to the streets too. East Ukraine and Crimea said the new Kiev government was illegitimate and demanded a referendum to decide on the future of the region.

As no agreement was reached between the two parties, protesters started taking over the buildings of regional administrations, declaring independence from Kiev. In turn, Kiev launched a crackdown operation in April which turned into an ongoing military conflict.


A woman looks through a damaged entrance door as pro-Russian demonstrators hold a rally outside the regional government building in Donetsk, March 3, 2014. (Reuters / Stringer)
READ MORE: Ukraine’s killing fields in 10 stories: RT reporter goes to Lugansk and Donetsk
A total of 4,634 people have been killed and 10,243 injured since the start of the conflict, according to a December report from the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights.

Global protests against Israeli military op in Gaza

Thousands of people across the globe took to the streets in 2014 to protest against Israel’s 50-day 'Operation Protective Edge' in the Gaza Strip, which started on July 8 in retaliation to Hamas rocket fire.
During Israel's offensive, more than 2,100 Palestinians were killed, most of them civilians. Among the victims at least 469 were children, according to a senior UN Children’s Fund (UNICEF) official.


Protesters gather at Place de la Republique during a banned demonstration in support of Gaza in central Paris, July 26, 2014. (Reuters / Benoit Tessier)
Protesters from America to Australia joined in support of the Palestinians, with the most massive rallies taking place in the UK. The move was supported by hundreds in France, Chile, India, Austria, Lebanon, the Netherlands, Germany, Morocco, Turkey, Oman, Spain, Malaysia, and many other countries.
READ MORE: Thousands rally against Gaza strikes in London, Paris, Dublin, Tel Aviv


Demonstrators protest to support the people of Gaza, in central London August 9, 2014. (Reuters / Luke MacGregor)
In Israel, anti-war activists and Palestinians protested the operation in Tel Aviv, despite a police ban on public gatherings due to military restrictions in cities targeted by Hamas rockets.

US demonstrations against police brutality

The US witnessed a wave of protests across the country in 2014, following the death of Eric Garner - a 43-year-old black Staten Island resident - in July.


Protesters stage a "Die-In" on a display taxi cab in the Forever 21 store in Times Square, during a march against police violence, in New York, December 7, 2014. (Reuters / Andrew Kelly)
The video of the incident shot by a passerby shows New York Police Department Officer Daniel Pantaleo placing Garner in an apparent chokehold, while a group of other officers force Garner to the ground.
Garner, who reportedly suffered from asthma, died after repeatedly saying, “I can’t breathe." His phrase became the backbone of the protests, which began right after his death.


Logan Browning, with duct tape over her mouth, joins demonstrators protesting against police violence, including the July chokehold death of unarmed black man Eric Garner in New York, as they march near the area where LAPD shot an assault suspect on December 5, in Hollywood, California December 6, 2014. (Reuters / Patrick T. Fallon)
Another incident that prompted people to take to the streets in protest against police violence was the shooting of unarmed black teenager Michael Brown by white police officer Darren Wilson in Ferguson, Missouri in August.
The protests were fueled by the fact that Wilson was not indicted by a grand jury in November. Hundreds were arrested across the US as they rallied against the grand jury decision. The hands-up gesture became the symbol of the protest, as witnesses claimed Brown had his hands raised when he was shot.
READ MORE: No indictment: Clashes, arson after grand jury verdict for Ferguson cop


Members of a rowdy group of demonstrators stand with their hands up as they are lit by a police spotlight on West Florissant during protests in reaction to the shooting of Michael Brown near Ferguson, Missouri August 18, 2014. (Reuters / Lucas Jackson)
In December, the non-indictment of Daniel Pantaleo gave new momentum to the Garner protests. Following the jury’s decision, people in New York City and San Francisco gathered in protest, demonstrating with several 'die-ins.'
READ MORE: Dozens arrested as NYC protests Eric Garner decision
Residents of Boston, Atlanta, Chicago, Baltimore, Minneapolis, and other US cities staged protests against the jury’s decision. Demonstrators in London also showed solidarity with the US rallies.
Tens of thousands joined the 'Millions March' in New York City to protest against police brutality, as well as the non-indictment of officers in both cases.

READ MORE: #BlackLivesMatter: Anonymous calls for march of millions over police brutality
#HandsUpWalkOut rallies spread across the US, commemorating Brown, Garner, and other people lost to police violence - including John Crawford III, Tamir Rice, Akai Gurley, Israel Hernandez, Oscar Grant, Ezell Ford, and Ramarley Graham.
After Christmas, demonstrations under the mottos “Hands up, don’t shoot" and“Black lives matter,” as well as “No justice, no peace!” took place in several major American cities. The number of protesters peaked in Los Angeles, where over 5,000 took part in the so-called 'Millions March for First Amendment Rights.'

Kurdish drive during ISIS Kobani assault

Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS) militants have gained momentum in 2014, declaring an unrecognized caliphate and extending control of territories in Iraq and northern Syria. As the jihadists tried to advance in Syria, all eyes were on the courageous Kurdish fighters of the city of Ayn al-Arab – also known under the name of Kobani. Since September, the militants have been storming the border city with Turkey in Syria's north, while the Kurds have defended it.


Protesters carry pictures of Abdullah Ocalan, the jailed leader of the Kurdistan Workers' Party (PKK), during a demonstration in support of Kurdish fighters and the besieged citizens of the Syrian town of Kobani and against the Islamic State, in Aleppo's Kurdish neighbourhood of Sheikh Maksoud November 1, 2014 (Reuters / Hosam Katan)
The pro-Kurdish protests started in autumn in Turkey, where Kurds are the largest ethnic minority. People were furious over what they called Ankara’s inadequate response to ISIS threats.
Protesters were met with tear gas and water cannons. The subsequent rioting and violence resulted in over 40 fatalities by October.


Demonstrators gesture as they gather to protest against Islamic State during a rally in solidarity with the people of the Syrian Kurdish town of Kobani, in Diyarbakir, in the Kurdish dominated southeastern Turkey November 1, 2014 (Reuters / Sertac Kayar)
November 1 saw an international day of protest for the Kurds, with tens of thousands rallying across the world in support of the Kurdish fighters in Kobani, demanding stronger military action to combat the jihadists.
READ MORE: Global day for Kobani: Thousands march to support Kurds’ fight against ISIS

More at: http://rt.com




 “Darkness cannot drive out darkness: only light can do that. 
H
ate cannot drive out hate: only love can do that.”
 Martin Luther King Jr


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