Latest topics
» Dave "the Douche Bag" Schmidt FINALLY SHUTS UP & takes a break from ripping you off!!!!
Today at 2:34 am by RamblerNash

» Office Of PROOFness - ZAP/Jerzy "The Next Lame Excuse"
Today at 2:21 am by RamblerNash

» NIBIRU News ~ World Wide Sky Images plus MORE
Today at 1:35 am by PurpleSkyz

» Bright fireball over the State of Bahia, Brazil
Today at 1:26 am by PurpleSkyz

» Jeff Rense & Tony Ghepardo - Stunning New Revelations About Deadly GMOs - Pt 1,2&3
Today at 1:23 am by PurpleSkyz

»  Massive Ancient Underwater Caves Reveal Ancient Mayan Relics
Today at 1:22 am by PurpleSkyz

» Counterpart | Official Trailer
Today at 1:09 am by PurpleSkyz

» UPS AND FED X AND THEIR SPYING
Yesterday at 11:23 pm by PurpleSkyz

» Devil In Details: Parkland Florida School Shooting, Media Actors and Handlers
Yesterday at 7:56 pm by terbo56

» Wi-Fi Devices Increase Mercury Release From Dental Amalgams
Yesterday at 7:52 pm by PurpleSkyz

»  Leading Consciousness Researcher Bridges the Gap Between Science and Real Magic
Yesterday at 7:50 pm by PurpleSkyz

» Karen Hudes ~ Network of Global Corporate Control 2 20 18
Yesterday at 7:11 pm by terbo56

» Full Audio Of California / Oregon UFO Incident. (Part 1-3)
Yesterday at 5:31 pm by PurpleSkyz

» How the Shamanic Medicine Iboga Can Resolve and Heal Childhood Trauma
Yesterday at 5:02 pm by Consciousness Of Economic

» Domestication And the Dream of the Planet - The Four Agreement By Don Miguel Ruiz
Yesterday at 4:54 pm by Consciousness Of Economic

» PRESIDENT TRUMP TO OPEN NIXON'S ALIEN ET TIME CAPSULE? DARK JOURNALIST
Yesterday at 1:01 pm by PurpleSkyz

» POOFness for FEB 18: NO MAN CAN FIND THE WAR
Yesterday at 12:45 pm by RamblerNash

» Cannabis Strains For Bladder Cancer
Yesterday at 12:13 pm by PurpleSkyz

» Antony Sutton, Skull&Bones, bankrolling the enemy by Jon Rappoport
Yesterday at 12:11 pm by PurpleSkyz

» Sound in a Space Vacuum - It's a Miracle!
Yesterday at 11:18 am by PurpleSkyz

» Scientists Reverse The Age of White Blood Cells In A Female Human Being
Yesterday at 11:13 am by PurpleSkyz

» The End of the Great Fraud Begins Here and Now by Anna von Reitz
Yesterday at 10:36 am by PurpleSkyz

» Water Anomaly - Bartlett Lake disappearing - Unrecognizable
Yesterday at 10:11 am by PurpleSkyz

» UFO News ~ Footage of UFOs Attacking each other over Nevada plus MORE
Yesterday at 10:07 am by PurpleSkyz

» NIBIRU News ~ Planet X/Nibiru Easily Visible from Mexico plus MORE
Yesterday at 9:54 am by PurpleSkyz

» David Icke interviewed on the Vin Armani Show (Parts 1,2&3)
Yesterday at 9:30 am by PurpleSkyz

» DISEASES WITH UNKNOWN ETIOLOGY TRACE BACK TO MASS VACCINATION AG
Yesterday at 9:27 am by PurpleSkyz

» Sirius is Dog Star and brightest star
Yesterday at 9:22 am by PurpleSkyz

» Q is Back with NEW information #ANON @potus
Yesterday at 7:06 am by LadyDragon

» MORE POOPNESS - INTERNATIONAL HANDS
Yesterday at 1:36 am by robert18

» " DOGS OF WAR " ( SSP Whistleblowers )
Yesterday at 12:59 am by PurpleSkyz

» OPERATION GLADIO C: Government-Sponsored Domestic Terrorism Targets American Public Schools
Yesterday at 12:35 am by PurpleSkyz

» David Wilcock (Feb 20, 2018) - Disclosure, Cabal's Defeat, Ancient Aliens & Inner Earth
Yesterday at 12:32 am by PurpleSkyz


You are not connected. Please login or register

Out Of Mind » SOLAR & PLANETARY ALERTS & INFO » EARTH CHANGES » Strong M5.9 earthquake hits Fukushima Prefecture, Japan

Strong M5.9 earthquake hits Fukushima Prefecture, Japan

Go down  Message [Page 1 of 1]

PurpleSkyz

avatar
Admin
Strong M5.9 earthquake hits Fukushima Prefecture, Japan


Posted by TW on October 06, 2017 



 

A strong and shallow earthquake registered by the JMA as M5.9 hit Fukushima Prefecture, Japan at 14:56 UTC (23:56 JST) on October 6, 2017. The agency is reporting a depth of 50 km (31 miles). EMSC is reporting M5.4 at a depth of 60 km (37.3 miles); USGS M5.4 at a depth of 47.4 km (29.4 miles).
According to the USGS, the epicenter was located 28.4 km (17.7 miles) E of Iwaki (population 357 309), 46 km (28.6 miles) SSE of Namie (population 21 866), 52.9 km (32.9 miles) NE of Kitaibaraki (population 50 843), 60.3 km (37.5 miles) NE of Takahagi (population 33 576), and 96.9 km (60.2 miles) SE of Fukushima (population 294 237), Japan.
This is 33 km (20.5 miles) NNW of crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant.
This earthquake poses no tsunami risk, JMA said. It comes just 7 hours after a shallow M6.0 earthquake hit off the east coast of Honshu.
There are 1 420 000 people living within 100 km (62 miles).
There were no immediate reports of damage or injuries.

Seismotectonics of Japan and vicinity

The North America plate, Pacific plate, Philippine Sea plate, and Eurasia plate all influence the tectonic setting of Japan, Taiwan, and the surrounding area. Some authors divide the edges of these plates into several microplates that together take up the overall relative motions between the larger tectonic blocks, including the Okhotsk microplate in northern Japan, the Okinawa microplate in southern Japan, the Yangzee microplate in the area of the East China Sea, and the Amur microplate in the area of the Sea of Japan.
The seafloor expression of the boundary between the Pacific and North America plates lies 300 km off the east coasts of Hokkaido and Honshu at the Kuril-Kamchatka and Japan trenches. The subduction of the Pacific plate beneath the North America plate, at rates of 83-90 mm/yr, generates abundant seismicity, predominantly as a result of interplate slip along the interface between the plates. The 1958 M 8.4 Etorofu, 1963 M 8.6 Kuril, 2003 M 8.3 Tokachi-Oki, and the 2011 M 9.0 Tohoku earthquakes all exemplify such megathrust seismicity. The 1933 M 8.4 Sanriku-Oki earthquake and the 1994 M 8.3 Shikotan earthquake are examples of intraplate seismicity, caused by deformation within the lithosphere of the subducting Pacific plate (Sanriku-Oki) and of the overriding North America plate (Shikotan), respectively.
At the southern terminus of the Japan Trench the intersection of the Pacific, North America, and Philippine Sea plates forms the Boso Triple Junction, the only example of a trench-trench-trench intersection in the world. South of the triple junction the Pacific plate subducts beneath the Philippine Sea plate at the Izu-Ogasawara trench, at rates of 45-56 mm/yr. This margin is noteworthy because of the steep dip of the subducting Pacific plate (70° or greater below depths of 50 km depth), and because of its heterogeneous seismicity; few earthquakes above M 7 occur at shallow depths, yet many occur below 400 km. The lack of large shallow megathrust earthquakes may be a result of weak coupling at the plate interface, or simply a reflection of an incomplete earthquake catalog with respect to the length of typical seismic cycles.
The northernmost section of the Philippine Sea plate shares a 350 km boundary with the North America plate that runs approximately east-west from the Boso Triple Junction towards the Izu Peninsula. This short boundary is dominated by the subduction of the Philippine Sea plate beneath Japan along the Sagami Trough, but also includes small sections of transform motion.
The subduction of the Philippine Sea plate under the Eurasia plate begins at the Suruga Trough, immediately southwest of the Izu peninsula. In the northern Tōkai, Tonankai and Nankai sections of this subduction zone, historical data indicate M 8+ earthquake recurrence intervals of 100-150 years. The Tonankai and Nankai sections last ruptured in M 8.1 earthquakes in 1944 and 1946, respectively, while the Tōkai section last broke in 1854. In the 1980's studies began to forecast the imminence of a large earthquake in the Tōkai region, and warned of its potential impact on the cities of Tokyo and Yokohama (the two largest cities in Japan); to date, the expected event has not occurred.
The boundary between the Philippine Sea and Eurasia plates continues south and southwestwards from the Suruga Trough, extending 2000 km along the Nankai and Ryukyu trenches before reaching the island of Taiwan. Along the Ryukyu Trench, the Philippine Sea plate exhibits trench normal subduction at rates increasing from 48 mm/yr in the northeast to 65 mm/yr in the southwest. Convergence and the associated back-arc deformation west of the oceanic trench creates the Ryukyu Islands and the Okinawa Trough. The largest historic event observed along this subduction zone was the M 8.1 Kikai Island earthquake in 1911.
In the vicinity of Taiwan the structure of the Philippine Sea: Eurasia plate boundary and the associated pattern of seismicity becomes more complex. 400 km east of Taiwan a clockwise rotation in the trend of the margin (from NE-SW to E-W), paired with an increase in subduction obliquity creates a section of the plate boundary that exhibits dextral transform and oblique thrusting motions. South of Taiwan the polarity of subduction flips; the Eurasia plate subducts beneath the Philippine Sea plate. Debate surrounds contrasting models of the plate boundary position between the zones of oppositely verging subduction, and the boundary's relation to patterns of seismicity. Many studies propose that crustal thickening causes the majority of regional seismicity, while others attribute seismicity to deformation associated with subduction. Another resolution proposes a tear in the Philippine Sea plate and a complex assortment of subduction, transform, and collisional motion. All the models concede that seismicity around the island of Taiwan is anomalously shallow, with few earthquakes deeper than 70km.
While there are no instances of an earthquake M>8 in the modern record, Taiwan and its surrounding region have experienced eight M>7.5 events between 1900 and 2014. The dominance of shallow M<8 earthquakes suggests fairly weak plate boundary coupling, with most earthquakes caused by internal plate deformation. The 1935 M 7.1 Hsinchu-Taichung earthquake and the 1999 M 7.6 Chi-Chi Earthquake both exemplify the shallow continental crust thrust faulting that dominates regional seismicity across the island. A major tectonic feature of the island is the Longitudinal Valley Fault, which ruptures frequently in small, shallow earthquakes. In 1951, the Longitudinal Valley Fault hosted twelve M≥6 events known as the Hualien-Taitung earthquake sequence.
Large earthquakes in the vicinity of Japan and Taiwan have been both destructive and deadly. The regions high population density makes shallow earthquakes especially dangerous. Since 1900 there have been 13 earthquakes (9 in Japan, 4 in Taiwan) that have each caused over 1000 fatalities, leading to a total of nearly 200,000 earthquake related deaths. In January 1995 an earthquake that ruptured a southern branch of the Japan Median Tectonic Line near the city of Kobe (population 1.5 million) killed over 5000 people. The 1923 Kanto earthquake shook both Yokohama (population 500,000, at that time) and Tokyo (population 2.1 million), killing 142,000 people. The earthquake also started fires that burned down 90% of the buildings in Yokohama and 40% of the buildings in Tokyo. Most recently, the M9.0 Tohoku earthquake, which ruptured a 400 km stretch of the subduction zone plate boundary east of Honshu, and the tsunami it generated caused over 20,000 fatalities. (USGS)
Featured image credit: USGS

Thanks to: https://watchers.news



  

PurpleSkyz

avatar
Admin
Strong and shallow M6.0 earthquake hits off the east coast of Honshu, Japan

Posted by TW on October 06, 2017 



 

A strong and shallow earthquake registered by the JMA as M6.0 hit off the east coast of Honshu at 07:59 UTC on October 6, 2017. The agency is reporting a depth of 10 km (6.2 miles). USGS and EMSC are reporting the same magnitude and depth.
According to the USGS, the epicenter was located 245.8 km (152.7 miles) ESE of Onagawa Chō (population 0), 255.1 km (158.5 miles) ESE of Ishinomaki (population 117 233), and 261.2 km (162.3 miles) E of Namie (population 21 866), Japan.
This earthquake poses no tsunami risk, JMA said.
There are no people living within 100 km (62 miles). Some 49 409 000 people are estimated to have felt weak shaking.
This is the first M6.0+ earthquake since September 26th M6.0 near the east coast of Honshu and M6.4 near Fiji and Vanuatu.
The USGS issued a green alert for shaking-related fatalities and economic losses. There is a low likelihood of casualties and damage.
Overall, the population in this region resides in structures that are resistant to earthquake shaking, though vulnerable structures exist. The predominant vulnerable building types are heavy wood frame and reinforced/confined masonry construction.
Recent earthquakes in this area have caused secondary hazards such as landslides and fires that might have contributed to losses.

Estimated population exposure to earthquake shaking



Selected cities exposed



Seismotectonics of Japan and vicinity

The North America plate, Pacific plate, Philippine Sea plate, and Eurasia plate all influence the tectonic setting of Japan, Taiwan, and the surrounding area. Some authors divide the edges of these plates into several microplates that together take up the overall relative motions between the larger tectonic blocks, including the Okhotsk microplate in northern Japan, the Okinawa microplate in southern Japan, the Yangzee microplate in the area of the East China Sea, and the Amur microplate in the area of the Sea of Japan.
The seafloor expression of the boundary between the Pacific and North America plates lies 300 km off the east coasts of Hokkaido and Honshu at the Kuril-Kamchatka and Japan trenches. The subduction of the Pacific plate beneath the North America plate, at rates of 83-90 mm/yr, generates abundant seismicity, predominantly as a result of interplate slip along the interface between the plates. The 1958 M 8.4 Etorofu, 1963 M 8.6 Kuril, 2003 M 8.3 Tokachi-Oki, and the 2011 M 9.0 Tohoku earthquakes all exemplify such megathrust seismicity. The 1933 M 8.4 Sanriku-Oki earthquake and the 1994 M 8.3 Shikotan earthquake are examples of intraplate seismicity, caused by deformation within the lithosphere of the subducting Pacific plate (Sanriku-Oki) and of the overriding North America plate (Shikotan), respectively.
At the southern terminus of the Japan Trench the intersection of the Pacific, North America, and Philippine Sea plates forms the Boso Triple Junction, the only example of a trench-trench-trench intersection in the world. South of the triple junction the Pacific plate subducts beneath the Philippine Sea plate at the Izu-Ogasawara trench, at rates of 45-56 mm/yr. This margin is noteworthy because of the steep dip of the subducting Pacific plate (70° or greater below depths of 50 km depth), and because of its heterogeneous seismicity; few earthquakes above M 7 occur at shallow depths, yet many occur below 400 km. The lack of large shallow megathrust earthquakes may be a result of weak coupling at the plate interface, or simply a reflection of an incomplete earthquake catalog with respect to the length of typical seismic cycles.
The northernmost section of the Philippine Sea plate shares a 350 km boundary with the North America plate that runs approximately east-west from the Boso Triple Junction towards the Izu Peninsula. This short boundary is dominated by the subduction of the Philippine Sea plate beneath Japan along the Sagami Trough, but also includes small sections of transform motion.
The subduction of the Philippine Sea plate under the Eurasia plate begins at the Suruga Trough, immediately southwest of the Izu peninsula. In the northern Tōkai, Tonankai and Nankai sections of this subduction zone, historical data indicate M 8+ earthquake recurrence intervals of 100-150 years. The Tonankai and Nankai sections last ruptured in M 8.1 earthquakes in 1944 and 1946, respectively, while the Tōkai section last broke in 1854. In the 1980's studies began to forecast the imminence of a large earthquake in the Tōkai region, and warned of its potential impact on the cities of Tokyo and Yokohama (the two largest cities in Japan); to date, the expected event has not occurred.
The boundary between the Philippine Sea and Eurasia plates continues south and southwestwards from the Suruga Trough, extending 2000 km along the Nankai and Ryukyu trenches before reaching the island of Taiwan. Along the Ryukyu Trench, the Philippine Sea plate exhibits trench normal subduction at rates increasing from 48 mm/yr in the northeast to 65 mm/yr in the southwest. Convergence and the associated back-arc deformation west of the oceanic trench creates the Ryukyu Islands and the Okinawa Trough. The largest historic event observed along this subduction zone was the M 8.1 Kikai Island earthquake in 1911.
In the vicinity of Taiwan the structure of the Philippine Sea: Eurasia plate boundary and the associated pattern of seismicity becomes more complex. 400 km east of Taiwan a clockwise rotation in the trend of the margin (from NE-SW to E-W), paired with an increase in subduction obliquity creates a section of the plate boundary that exhibits dextral transform and oblique thrusting motions. South of Taiwan the polarity of subduction flips; the Eurasia plate subducts beneath the Philippine Sea plate. Debate surrounds contrasting models of the plate boundary position between the zones of oppositely verging subduction, and the boundary's relation to patterns of seismicity. Many studies propose that crustal thickening causes the majority of regional seismicity, while others attribute seismicity to deformation associated with subduction. Another resolution proposes a tear in the Philippine Sea plate and a complex assortment of subduction, transform, and collisional motion. All the models concede that seismicity around the island of Taiwan is anomalously shallow, with few earthquakes deeper than 70km.
While there are no instances of an earthquake M>8 in the modern record, Taiwan and its surrounding region have experienced eight M>7.5 events between 1900 and 2014. The dominance of shallow M<8 earthquakes suggests fairly weak plate boundary coupling, with most earthquakes caused by internal plate deformation. The 1935 M 7.1 Hsinchu-Taichung earthquake and the 1999 M 7.6 Chi-Chi Earthquake both exemplify the shallow continental crust thrust faulting that dominates regional seismicity across the island. A major tectonic feature of the island is the Longitudinal Valley Fault, which ruptures frequently in small, shallow earthquakes. In 1951, the Longitudinal Valley Fault hosted twelve M≥6 events known as the Hualien-Taitung earthquake sequence.
Large earthquakes in the vicinity of Japan and Taiwan have been both destructive and deadly. The regions high population density makes shallow earthquakes especially dangerous. Since 1900 there have been 13 earthquakes (9 in Japan, 4 in Taiwan) that have each caused over 1000 fatalities, leading to a total of nearly 200,000 earthquake related deaths. In January 1995 an earthquake that ruptured a southern branch of the Japan Median Tectonic Line near the city of Kobe (population 1.5 million) killed over 5000 people. The 1923 Kanto earthquake shook both Yokohama (population 500,000, at that time) and Tokyo (population 2.1 million), killing 142,000 people. The earthquake also started fires that burned down 90% of the buildings in Yokohama and 40% of the buildings in Tokyo. Most recently, the M9.0 Tohoku earthquake, which ruptured a 400 km stretch of the subduction zone plate boundary east of Honshu, and the tsunami it generated caused over 20,000 fatalities. (USGS)
Featured image credit: USGS

Thanks to: https://watchers.news



  

Back to top  Message [Page 1 of 1]

Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum